Category Archives: Mobile Marketing

The Six Best Practices for Hotels on Twitter

Twitter-Logo_1

Twitter is a social media platform that offers your property an outstanding marketing device as well as a guest service channel.  With over 230 million monthly active users, the number of connections you can make with prospective travelers is seemingly limitless.

However, this social media network has a distinct vernacular that can be confusing and intimidating for new users.  Whether you are just composing your first tweet, or are a seasoned Twitter Pro, here are a few ideas that will make the most of your Twitter presence.

1. It All Starts with your Bio

Although your individual tweets provide content that you hope will lure followers your way, your profile is the most important message you will ever write on Twitter.  It will help people decide whether or not they want to follow you.  With a 160-character limit, you can’t say everything that sets your property apart, so choose a few keywords to describe your hotel and then say something that will set your feed apart from the rest.  Try including local tips, a unique passion or a value proposition.

2. Cultivate a Community

The more followers your Twitter account has, the greater your reach will be within the Twittersphere, but it is important to remember that it is not just about numbers.  Buying a list or indiscriminately following users in the hopes they will follow you back will mostly result in droids and people with no interest in your brand.

Instead, cultivate a community of users who share an affinity for your hotel or destination by using directories like Wefollow and Twellow.  Make sure to check out followers of industry partners or properties that are similar to yours.  From this point, you can grow your following organically by being active, resourceful and likable, by sharing and commenting on interesting, relevant content.  Make sure to include links and @ mentions.  The use of hashtags will make your easier to find and follow and will allow you to contribute to topics, thus allowing people to find you.

3. Listen First

It is important to think of Twitter less as a broadcasting channel, and more as a listening channel.  If nothing else, you can set up a profile to capture mentions of your brand through e-mail alerts.

Twitter is unique in the fact that most tweets are sent in real-time about what people are doing and thinking right now.  Many people use social media to talk about what they are doing while on vacation or during the planning phase of their trip.  That provides an opportunity to connect with them in a relevant way.

Sasha Kerman, content and community manager for the luxury boutique hotel operator Red Carnation Hotels, agrees with using Twitter to make that unique connection.  Red Carnation uses Twitter as a tool to listen to guests and provide them with the best possible experience.  This includes sending welcome tweets to guests they know use Twitter and occasionally surprising them with an in-room amenity.

4. Act Quickly

Like any other form of communication with guests, it is important to respond to Twitter in a timely matter.  Piper Stevens, the director of social media at Loews Hotels and Resorts, stated that customer service is the most effective use of Twitter for their properties.  This includes “being able to answer questions quickly and remedy issues for our guests that are on property.”

Often, travelers turn to Twitter when they want to vent about a negative experience.  In this case, acting quickly allows you to take the matter offline where a hotel can resolve the issue before it escalates.  If this is done properly, you may be able to turn an upset guest into an advocate.

5. Think Before you Tweet

Because there are no hard and fast rules that can be applied to Twitter, it can be difficult to determine what to tweet, or even how often.  Make sure that your tweets are interesting to your followers and relevant to your hotel or destination.  This could include road trip playlists, travel wellness or eco-friendly travel.

Try to maintain good Twitter etiquette by not tweeting rampantly or sounding off.  Use direct messaging or start with the @Name to avoid clogging followers’ feeds with private tweets.  It’s not a requirement that you use all 140 characters, and try to #take #it #easy #on the #hashtags.  It will only clutter the brilliance of your message.

6. Write Promotional Tweets that Get Noticed

It can be difficult to find a balance between overtweeting and undertweeting, and you do not want to lose followers with relentless selling.  However, many people follow brands on social networks specifically to receive promotions and discounts.  So do not disappoint them!

In order to maximize the impact of promotional or “direct response” tweets, try including a compelling offer, a strong call to action and a sense of urgency.  Words like “exclusive”, “free”, “sale” and “win” will drive higher click-through rates.  When you are working with promotional tweets, it is better to keep them free of distractions like hashtags, @mentions and imagery.

Incorporate all of these Twitter tips and tactics into your social media campaign, and you will reap the benefits with increased exposure and a better overall guest experience for your current and future customers.

Top 10 Hospitality Industry Trends for 2014

3024169-poster-travel-trends-for-2014-post-image

With the calendar changing to 2014 in the next week, many industry experts are attempting to project what will happen, what changes will be made and how they will affect your business over the next 12 months.  HospitalityNet’s Robert Rauch created a list of the Top 10 Hospitality Industry Trends in 2014 that focuses on the emergence of a key demographic in the travel industry:  Millennials.  Let’s take a look at a few of Rauch’s insights.

1) Millennials will become the core customer within the travel and hospitality industries over the next five to ten years.  Most travel companies, hotels and airlines will benefit as this group enters their peak earning, spending and traveling years.  Exploration, interaction and experience are the major focus of Millennials, as well as within the subsets of this generation.

Many travelers are willing to pay more for a greater experience.  “Foodies” are prevalent in this subset of the market and are looking for an overall gourmet experience for a reasonable price.  This will likely cause the industry to revamp lobby bars, restaurants and food service in general.  Other groups including Internet bloggers, culture buffs, LGBT and Multi-generational travelers are looking for that unique experience that will command change within the market.

2) Speed and precision will be a requirement when accommodating Millennials in upcoming years.  This group is looking for fast booking, fast check-in, fast WiFi and fast responses to customer service needs.  If these are not implemented within hotels and other properties, Millennials will have no problem speaking out over a variety of channels like Twitter, Facebook, Yelp or online travel reviews sites to voice their complaints.

3) WOW customer service will become even more influential in 2014.  Service today can be broken down into four levels:  basic, expected, desired and WOW.  Basic service can be found at a post office, whereas expected service can be found at most fast food restaurants and many standard businesses.  Good hotels will find a way to provide desired experience, but WOW service is really the only way to take that next step and ensure repeat business.

Creating an impressive, unique guest experience that exceeds all expectations will allow you to capture the customer.  It may also earn additional business when this guest announces their WOW experience on various social media platforms.

4) Leadership is showing your management team that there are more important things than just “talking the talk”; it is important to “walk the talk”.  Each and every employee has something that they can work on.  It is of extreme importance to form a connection with guests in a time where Millennials are looking for interaction and a unique experience.

Rauch states that it is his goal as a leader to instill the value of building relationships by sharing the knowledge he has while learning from both his employees and guests.  He runs with guests staying at one of his hotels, and offers personal training sessions for others.

5) Expectation of more international visitors.  Average rates and occupancy levels in the United States are likely to increase over the next few years, influenced by a very new market.  According to Arne Sorenson, President and CEO of Marriott Hotels and Resorts, leisure demand from abroad, fueled in part by the new Discover America campaign, will stimulate a new demand.

China is at the center of this international travel boom, preparing to send about 100 million leisure travelers abroad every year.  If the U.S. gets its typical share of this population, that will mean an additional 10 million visitors annually from China alone.  With the average Chinese travelers spending at least a week in the U.S., demand is created for an additional 70 million room nights in a market where prices are steadily rising.  Globalization in the travel industry will likely prove to be a massive force.

To read the remaining trends on this list, or to find our more information about Robert Rauch, click here.

Loyalty Takes a Backseat to Deals

BrandLoyalty_627x330

According to Accenture Hospitality’s Global Consumer Pulse Research, in the hotel and lodging industry loyalty takes a backseat to price.  The results of this survey, which questioned more than 12,000 customers in 32 countries, showed some information that hoteliers should keep in mind when planning marketing campaigns in 2014.

Accenture’s research found that 41 percent of customers find offers and deals as a top differentiator when choosing a hotel.  Umar Riaz, the North American lead for Accenture’s Hospitality practice believes that customer loyalty has dissipated with the rise of digital channels, which has made it incredibly easy for customers to shop around for deals.

According to the survey, 79 percent of customers made their hotel and travel bookings online.  This was a seven percent increase when compared to 2012. Currently, 41 percent of consumers use their mobile device frequently for online product searches and 33 percent use a device to make online purchases.

Customers are moving more and more towards digital and mobile channels.  Online travel agencies have made it easy and transparent to shop for deals.  Travelers may think that a particular product is good, but with so much technology at their fingertips, they still feel there’s a better deal out there.

If all of these other numbers did not convince, this may be the most important statistic of all: 75 percent of hotel customers have conducted business with two or more providers over the past three years, while only 14 percent stayed loyal to one company.

The travel industry as a product is strong, but the loyalty is low and this is one of the biggest challenges facing a lot of companies in the industry right now.  This may just make 2014 the year of increasing loyalty rates.

Raising the Bar in a Multi-Channel Travel World

multiScreen

Customer experience in the hotel industry, as in any industry, is about consistency.  It’s not enough to have the newest self-service tools, mobile apps or improved services.  Individually, these initiatives can work, but there needs to be consistency across all touch points based on guest requirements to ensure satisfaction.

Hotels are currently attempting to generate solutions that address not only customer service issues, but user experience issues as well.  Creating an unambiguous cross-channel experience is of paramount importance.  Stan Kreydin, Senior Vice President and Chief Technology Officer for Wyndham Exchange and Rentals explained his views on the subject:

 “Where possible, we want our customers to have a similar experience with our products via self-service channels such as the web as they do with our contact center agents for our assisted service channels.”

For most hotel guests, the experience enjoyed with the hotel staff is engaging in streamlined.  It must also be a top priority for consumers to feel the same way when interacting with a website or mobile app.  Some companies, including the Morgans Hotel Group, have made significant changes to websites including the ability to make reservations in a limited number of clicks, tour the city they’re visiting with a curated Google Map and access an Instagram feed populated with photos from guests staying at the property.

It’s always important to recognize your target demographic when utilizing new technologies.  Pullman Hotels and Resort focuses on delivering a cosmopolitan, vibrant and in-style experience for guests.  The company has worked on a unique guest technology ecosystem centered on synchronizing various screens – TV, smartphone and table – in order to create a unified network of entertainment services.

However, the multi-device phenomenon does not only affect the online experience offered by Pullman.  The hotels and resorts have multiplied IP addresses, which has allowed the company to increase the bandwidth at all Pullman properties.  Multiple power sockets placed near beds allows guests easy access to devices throughout their stay.

Hotels worldwide are currently all trying to match guests’ rising expectations.  Check-in and check-out is one area where guests do not like wasting time and expect immediate service.  The same goes for free WiFi which they expect to have access to as soon as they enter the property.  Amenities that were once considered luxuries have now become an expectation among travelers, and hotels need to adapt or will find themselves left behind.

The Evolution of Online Search: SEO, SEM and Keyword Bidding

seo-wordle

Search engine optimization and search engine marketing can be very effective ways for hotels to reach prospective guests, but as the “keyword world” changes, hoteliers need to keep pace.  As online search features continue to change, there must be a greater focus on developing higher quality content for guests to compete against online travel agencies.

OTAs’ ads outnumber hotel brands’ ads on Google, Bing and AOL, but not on Google Mobile according to a recent BrandVerity study titled “Hotel Brands, OTAs and paid search: How do these relationships unfold on the SERP?”

According to the study, each Google Search Engine Results Page included almost two OTA ads.  Bing and AOL had considerably more, with 4.77 and 5.27 OTA ads per SERP, respectively.  The number of OTA ads per SERP on Google Mobile was only .49.

It is important to nail down the art and science of keyword bidding, and this is evident in the case of Expedia. They spent a substantial amount of time studying the science, and as a result their “quality score” translates to less expensive cost-per-click prices.  You can learn more about keyword bidding here.

Budgeting for SEO and SEM can vary across the spectrum of hotels.  Budget and economy hotels do not need to spend as much time on SEO because they rely more heavily on brand traffic, walk-in traffic and ratings and reviews sites.  However, If the return on ad spend is positive and you are getting better returns than spending with OTAs, meta-search, meeting planners or travel agents, the investment should be considered worthwhile and continued.

Book Hotel Keyboard

From Desktop to Mobile: The 2013 Shift in Hotel Bookings

cross-device_app_ecosystem-desktop-tablet-phone

As technology continues to shift the way people acquire information, travel sites have observed a shift in the way potential travelers are accessing and booking hotel reservations.  A HeBSdigital case study has quantified this data, and shows how dramatic this shift has been in the past 12 months.

Some of the Key Developments found in Q3 2013 include:

*Over 35% of web visitors and nearly 32% of page views were generated from non-desktop devices including mobile and tablets.  Within this statistic, the iPad outperformed all other tablet devices and was responsible for 88.2% of page views and nearly 97% of tablet revenue.

*Over 12% of bookings, room nights and revenue came from tables and mobile devices.  This does not include voice reservations originating from the mobile websites of HeBSdigital clients.

*Tables generated 210% more room nights and 603% more revenue than “pure” mobile devices.

Notable Developments from Q3 2012 to Q3 2013 include:

*Page views, visits, bookings, room nights and revenue have all declined through the desktop channel.

*Website visitors to desktop websites declined by 17%, while increasing by nearly 85% via mobile channels.

*Revenue from mobile devices nearly doubled as travel consumers become more comfortable conducting transactions through their smartphones and as smartphone penetration reaches an all-time high – nearly 50% in the U.S.

With this dynamic shift from desktop to mobile/tablet options, what can you do to ensure your content is properly accessed?  Try to treat the desktop, mobile and tablet as three separate channels:

Desktop Channel:  Always make sure your desktop website is in good health, and complies with best practices in hotel distribution, design, site architecture and SEO.

Mobile Channel:  A mobile website generates incremental revenue through mobile and voice reservations.

Tablet Channel:   Present tablet users with an enhanced, highly-visual version of the desktop website enabled for the touch-screen tablet environment.

Make sure the correct website content is being served in the right device category while ensuring the maximum user experience, relevancy of information and conversions.  All three channels (desktop, mobile, tablet) must be integrated in the hotel’s multi-channel marketing strategy. Use analytics to determine contributions from and the dynamics of each of the three channels.

For more information on this study or to see additional studies regarding the Three Screen Shift, click here.

MobileDigital_0

Future of Content: Upcoming Trends in 2014

MobileDigital_0

It is a tremendous time to be involved in the digital marketing sector with almost half of the global population having access to the internet.  However, the way consumers consume this content is rapidly evolving, and with that comes an interesting array of challenges and opportunities.  Having a firm understanding of these upcoming trends is vital in laying the foundation for defining the content goals within an organization and deciding where resources will be allocated.

Knowledge regarding these four trends is paramount for those companies looking to succeed in both B2B and B2C communication going forward.  Let’s take a look at the upcoming content trends of 2014.

Trend 1:  Competition to Gain Consumers’ Attention Will Increase

Each day there are somewhere in the neighborhood of 92,000 new articles posted on the internet.  This means that posting new, unique content regularly is not enough to drive traffic to your site.  Digital media publishers have created systems to produce the greatest amount of content for the lowest price.  Need an example?  The Huffington Post produces at least 1,200 piece of content each day, while Forbes produces 400.

What can smaller businesses to do differentiate themselves when they are unable to compete based on sheer volume alone?  This is where the development of a content strategy can come into play.  It is incredibly important to understand a company’s unique value proposition, and if a company does not have one, you must understand where there is space to create one.

Are you marketing a “think” product that requires heavy consideration before purchase, or is it a “feel” product where emotion plays an important role in the buying process?  You could be marketing a “high involvement” product, one where the consumer is heavily involved in the buying decision, or a “low involvement” product that is more likely purchased impulsively.

With high involvement/think products, the focus of your content should involve plenty of information on the product features, benefits of the product in addition to growing the product and brand awareness.  This will make it easier for consumers to both discover and search for your product.

Low involvement/feel products should have a campaign focused on connecting with consumers and appealing to emotions.  There should also be a focus on building brand loyalty and retention of customers for repeat purchases.

Trend 2:  Determining Key Metrics to Measure Content’s Success Will be Important

Traffic and page views have long been the chosen metrics for gauging content success, but these statistics on their own can be misleading.  More importantly, solely focusing on traffic can lead to an overemphasis on click-worthy headlines, overuse of keywords in a title and changing the focus from creating content for users to creating content for page views.

Whether you are using a combination of metrics to target and analyze (organic traffic, % returning visitors, changes in bounce rate and time on site), or gauging content by social metrics including Facebook likes and Twitter retweets, all of these activities can demonstrate the ability of a piece to gain a user’s attention, and that awareness is always worth something.

Trend 3:  Increased Interest in Content Integration/Content Being Produced for Multiple Channels.

The most sizeable obstacles involved in content often times have nothing to do with the content itself, and everything to do with proper resource allocation.  Whether this is lack of time to implement all goals, lack of budget to implement these strategies in an ideal way, or the constant battle with readjusting priorities, marketing becomes especially challenging.  This is only enhanced as more and more channels develop and digital innovation advances so quickly.

There is no perfect solution to this problem, but one way to balance hard resource constraints with the constant need for innovation is to develop better integration methodologies.  When a group of CMOs was polled by Forbes, they ranked integrated marketing communications ahead of effective advertising when it comes to the most important thing they want from an agency.

People are looking for that seamless retail experience, providing an on-brand, personalized, and consistent experience regardless of channel.  This requires content to be heavily involved in the multitude of channels from online to in-person to provide potential and current customers with one consistent conversation.

Trend 4:  Experimentation with Content in New Mediums

Did you know that approximately 60% of online devices are now smartphones or tablets?  Technology and digital innovation are experiencing rapid increases in growth, causing PCs to become a smaller percentage of connected devices.    As competition for attention increases, companies must be increasingly willing to experiment with content in new mediums including Smart TVs and connected wearables.

2014 will be an exciting time for the future of content. As technology evolves and competition for user attention increases, marketers need to be agile and adapt to the growing needs and expectations of their customers.

 

10 Travel Technology and Distribution Trends

Visuals

With the continued growth of technological progress in the travel landscape, hotel and travel companies that seek success must either catch up or risk becoming irrelevant, according to a new report.

“If you want to be successful and grow and perform well, you really have to understand the technology and what’s out there,” said Cees Bosselaar, director of business development and a destination marketing specialist for PhoCusWright, who presented findings from the company’s “Travel innovation & technology trends: 2013 and beyond” report during the World Travel Market in London.

Here, you’ll find five of the Top 10 Travel Technology and Distribution Trends that will help hotel and travel companies leverage innovation in the coming year and beyond.

1 – New Patterns of Content Challenge Distribution

The old model of travel distribution, which saw large intermediaries, including global distribution systems, aggregate content for booking, is being undermined by new models.

Personal clouds, for example, allow travelers to access information anywhere, anytime and on any device. The “Internet of things” enables integration of connectivity and objects that can influence a trip, such as real-time baggage location, weather conditions and homeland security advisories.  Pervasive online communications allow even small hotel companies to connect with customers in real-time, allowing them to shop and book without delay and from nearly any device. Those same companies, as well as the individuals they serve, also are better able to collect and integrate itinerary data from multiple sources without a GDS.

2 – Too Much Choice Means Less is Better

When people are given too many choices, their satisfaction level tends to decrease.  This model holds true with travel options as well.

Online travel agencies used to provide as many options as possible to exhibit their computing clout. Today the focus is on providing relevant results that target the specific needs and wants of each traveler.

New travelers have embraced technology and the multi-device format in which content can be consumed.  They want to be shown the correct information for their needs.

Providing targeted content is even more critical in the mobile arena, where smaller screens necessitate both streamlined offerings as well as the presentation of those offerings.

3 – Social Technologies Change the Shape of Travel

Facebook alone has more than 1 billion users, while social media as a whole reaches 85% of the world’s total Internet users, but some experts believe that travel companies have yet to unlock the true potential of this technological boom.

When it comes to a discussion of social media, the discussions of return on investment are outdated.  Instead, social media must be viewed as a way to engage with target customers.

Whether you like it or not, social media is here to stay.  And in the next five to 10 years, it will continue to generate leads and performance will be up.

4 – New Efficiencies Re-Energize the Customer Experience

As demand for customer service increases, new technological advances will lower its overall costs.  But travel companies must consider whether a penny saved comes at the risk of a pound of customer preference.

Excessive menu trees and outsourced call centers may cut monetary costs in the short term, but frustrate customers in the process.  Each travel company needs to determine how to use customer service technology appropriately in a way that continues to reduce cost while increasing customer satisfaction.

5 – Cross-Platform Data Access Engages Users

As customers realize their dreams of accessing desired digital information on any device or platform, hotel are facing a nightmare in providing the necessary development and support for this content.

HTML 5, which allows programmers to “write once, run anywhere” could be the solution to this frustration.

According to Bosselaar’s report, Cross-platform data access requires travel companies to track the changing user-interface patterns of their customers to provide the appropriate level of service. This must be a continuing process as new technologies evolve and businesses become less restrictive about the devices their employees can use for particular tasks. Suppliers and distributors that support the most user-friendly, convenient interfaces will enjoy increased market share.

It’s a continuing process of improving your apps and improving your mobile websites.  You have to continuously experiment, and you can’t be afraid to make some mistakes along the way!

You can see trends 6-10 and read the rest of this article here.