Category Archives: Phone Call Tracking

Death of the Cookie: 2014 Edition

cookie computer

When someone says the word cookie, inevitably everyone thinks about chocolate chips, macadamia nuts and maybe even Christmas.  However, in this case we are talking about the online tracking device that may be on its way out.  Nearly a year ago, we wrote a blog post detailing how cookies affect your individual business listing and call tracking ability.  This time around, we’ll discuss why consumers are against the tracking code and who stands to benefit from their diminishing existence.

What is a Cookie?

Cookies are small pieces of code that websites drop onto your browser as you surf the web.  They record what sites you have looked at.  Online advertising companies use this information to customize your online experience with ads generated off your browsing history.

There are two different types of cookies online:  first-party and third-party.  Almost every website serves a cookie, especially if you have to log into it.  Take online banking as an example.  The cookie reminds the bank’s website that you are logged in correctly.  If it were not there, the site would forget that you logged in and lock you out of your account.  Essentially, the web does not work with these first-party cookies.

The third-party cookies are currently under threat of extinction.  These cookies are served by other companies through the webpage you are looking at.  Going back to the banking example, the bank’s website might allow dozens of third parties to drop cookies onto your browser.  When you go to another site after the bank’s, those cookies will signal to other advertisers that a person with a recent history of checking their bank account has arrived.

Who is Attempting to do What to Stop Third-Party Cookies?

Apple, Microsoft and Mozilla (makers of the Firefox browser) are all planning to launch browsers with default “Do Not Track” settings.  These settings will be rigged to reject cookies or to signal the user does not wish to be tracked.

Paul Cimino, VP/GM of Brilig Digital Data Solutions at Merkle, said that his company found the number of machines you can see on the internet versus the number that you can cookie has been decreasing over the past three years to around 50%.

Much of this has to do with the fact that mobile devices (smartphones, tablets, etc.) cannot be cookied, and these have become a preferred way to “surf the net”.

Why are Cookies such a Taboo Subject?

In their simplest form, cookies are a breach of privacy for internet users.  Although they technically do not give away any personally identifying information about you, they do give advertisers an idea of what your interests are including what you are shopping for, where you live and into what demographics you fit.

The more web users who look at the internet with third-party cookies turned off, the fewer users there are for advertisers to target.

Privacy advocates hate cookies because they carry information about what you search for on the web.  Organizations like the Electronic Privacy Information Center and Abine have anti-cookie stances because, as EPIC puts it, “a cookie is a mechanism that allows a website to record your comings and goings, usually without your knowledge or consent.”

Who Stands to Benefit from a Cookie-less Internet?

James Lamberti, vice president of the device recognition firm AdTruth, says the upshot here is that the data companies get from first-party cookies will be of much higher value as the third-party cookie becomes obsolete, and members of the online advertising ecosystem who do not have the first-party data could be left out in the cold.  This becomes a “rich get richer” proposition in the grand scheme of things.

“This could create a situation where you could have a couple of players, namely Google and Facebook, just take over and have so much power where it’s not good for the industry,” said Lamberti.

How Does This All Apply to ResortsandLodges.com?

When shopping for a unique travel experience, leisure travelers typically visit a website multiple times.  If these consumers are accessing sites from different channels like a smartphone or tablet, there are no cookies to track where they have already been.  Ultimately, this decreases the perceived lead conversion rate for a given property.

Another effect seen at ResortsandLodges.com, which is referenced in last year’s “Death of the Cookie” post, has to do with Phonalytics, our state-of-the-art call tracking system.  Cookies enable us to direct a tracking number to a property’s website when they reach the site through ResortsandLodges.com.

If travelers are making multiple visits to a site, they may bypass our site and head directly to a property website.  Without these cookies, we are unable to re-direct the user back to the proxy site (your site with the tracking in place), and the transaction occurs without being attributed to a specific advertisement that generated the booking.

Based on the data, an argument could be made that nearly 42% of calls being generated by ResortsandLodges.com to our partner properties are not able to be tracked or reported on.

10 Travel Technology and Distribution Trends

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With the continued growth of technological progress in the travel landscape, hotel and travel companies that seek success must either catch up or risk becoming irrelevant, according to a new report.

“If you want to be successful and grow and perform well, you really have to understand the technology and what’s out there,” said Cees Bosselaar, director of business development and a destination marketing specialist for PhoCusWright, who presented findings from the company’s “Travel innovation & technology trends: 2013 and beyond” report during the World Travel Market in London.

Here, you’ll find five of the Top 10 Travel Technology and Distribution Trends that will help hotel and travel companies leverage innovation in the coming year and beyond.

1 – New Patterns of Content Challenge Distribution

The old model of travel distribution, which saw large intermediaries, including global distribution systems, aggregate content for booking, is being undermined by new models.

Personal clouds, for example, allow travelers to access information anywhere, anytime and on any device. The “Internet of things” enables integration of connectivity and objects that can influence a trip, such as real-time baggage location, weather conditions and homeland security advisories.  Pervasive online communications allow even small hotel companies to connect with customers in real-time, allowing them to shop and book without delay and from nearly any device. Those same companies, as well as the individuals they serve, also are better able to collect and integrate itinerary data from multiple sources without a GDS.

2 – Too Much Choice Means Less is Better

When people are given too many choices, their satisfaction level tends to decrease.  This model holds true with travel options as well.

Online travel agencies used to provide as many options as possible to exhibit their computing clout. Today the focus is on providing relevant results that target the specific needs and wants of each traveler.

New travelers have embraced technology and the multi-device format in which content can be consumed.  They want to be shown the correct information for their needs.

Providing targeted content is even more critical in the mobile arena, where smaller screens necessitate both streamlined offerings as well as the presentation of those offerings.

3 – Social Technologies Change the Shape of Travel

Facebook alone has more than 1 billion users, while social media as a whole reaches 85% of the world’s total Internet users, but some experts believe that travel companies have yet to unlock the true potential of this technological boom.

When it comes to a discussion of social media, the discussions of return on investment are outdated.  Instead, social media must be viewed as a way to engage with target customers.

Whether you like it or not, social media is here to stay.  And in the next five to 10 years, it will continue to generate leads and performance will be up.

4 – New Efficiencies Re-Energize the Customer Experience

As demand for customer service increases, new technological advances will lower its overall costs.  But travel companies must consider whether a penny saved comes at the risk of a pound of customer preference.

Excessive menu trees and outsourced call centers may cut monetary costs in the short term, but frustrate customers in the process.  Each travel company needs to determine how to use customer service technology appropriately in a way that continues to reduce cost while increasing customer satisfaction.

5 – Cross-Platform Data Access Engages Users

As customers realize their dreams of accessing desired digital information on any device or platform, hotel are facing a nightmare in providing the necessary development and support for this content.

HTML 5, which allows programmers to “write once, run anywhere” could be the solution to this frustration.

According to Bosselaar’s report, Cross-platform data access requires travel companies to track the changing user-interface patterns of their customers to provide the appropriate level of service. This must be a continuing process as new technologies evolve and businesses become less restrictive about the devices their employees can use for particular tasks. Suppliers and distributors that support the most user-friendly, convenient interfaces will enjoy increased market share.

It’s a continuing process of improving your apps and improving your mobile websites.  You have to continuously experiment, and you can’t be afraid to make some mistakes along the way!

You can see trends 6-10 and read the rest of this article here.

Call Tracking Case Study: A 370 Unit Property in Galena, IL

After many years helping to validate advertising for online travel websites, we’re blown away by the impressive results as seen in the screenshot below. (Click to view larger)

Call tracking case study

Call tracking shows a quantifiable increase in room night sales.

This example is one of many case studies we’ve done that shows the difference between before a resort activates their tracking number across their web marketing channels, and after they make this simple change.

Call tracking is needed because thousands of properties are still reserving millions of dollars of revenue over the phone. Yes, most people research, plan, discover, and share their travel experiences online. However, because of the complexity and cost of planning a vacation, travelers still feel more comfortable making the final transaction to book their vacation over the telephone.

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